Author Topic: How to: Graduated filters  (Read 12955 times)

Offline shepgti

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How to: Graduated filters
« on: 07 September 2011, 12:44 »

Right thought i would do a small how to use filters(mainly grad filters)

ok so there are two ways you can use graduated filters;

1. with a filter in front of the lense before taking the shot

2.During the editing stage (post process eg in lightroom)

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1. Cokin P system (filter in front of lense)

here is a pic showing the setup of the cokin p system. main things you will need to use this system are as follows;

- Adapter to fit your lens thread size
- Filter holder
- Filters (wide range of filters can be used)





Adavantages of using this system is that you will see a 'live' image of what you are going to shoot with the filter in place which may influence the angle/postion/location you shoot.





2. Post process filters (Using Lightroom)

Lightroom's graduated filter tool can be a very powerful tool when used correctly and can turn a seeming dull picture into a more exciting one (example further down).


Here is a screen shot of the grad filter menu in lightroom



Key things to remember using this tool;

1.To apply the filter and keep it horizontal, hold down the shift key(dont know what it is on a mac!sorry)
2. Each picture will need differnt settings on each slider so play with them until you get the result your after.
3. Colour can be added to your filter which acts inependantly from the image itself therefore you can have a B&W image with a hint of colour from the filter which can give a nice effect.


here is a prime example of what a graduated filter can do




becomes..




Storm  a-brewin' by shepgti, on Flickr

Post processing carried out as follows;

cutsom tweaked infra red preset
straightend slightly
grad filter to sky (blue tint)
a poor vingette which was put on by accident! :laugh:




Feel free to add anything to this how to or ask any questions.


Offline the_stink

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #1 on: 07 September 2011, 12:53 »
 :cool:

Think i need to get lightroom! seems to be a bit more focused on the pp side than PS , guess both have thier uses :)

Offline Stronz

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #2 on: 07 September 2011, 12:56 »
I assume to achieve this effect in PS, it is a case of dragging a graduation / gradient onto a new layer on top of your image and positioning accordingly / changing colours etc?

Or is there a better way to do it?

Offline T_J_G

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #3 on: 07 September 2011, 12:57 »
Download the free trial, I did yesterday and am loving it!

I also bought a Cokin P series holder And adapter ring, just need some filters to go in it!

Offline shepgti

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #4 on: 07 September 2011, 12:59 »
I assume to achieve this effect in PS, it is a case of dragging a graduation / gradient onto a new layer on top of your image and positioning accordingly / changing colours etc?

Or is there a better way to do it?

should give the same result doing it like this and using the correct layer style for the grad layer (something like screen or overylay i would guess)


get the lightroom trial  :wink:

Offline shepgti

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #5 on: 07 September 2011, 13:00 »
Download the free trial, I did yesterday and am loving it!

I also bought a Cokin P series holder And adapter ring, just need some filters to go in it!

i have both cokin and kood filters and the kood filters are half the price but not half the quality  :wink:

Offline Stronz

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #6 on: 07 September 2011, 13:01 »
Yeah I might just do that...see what all the fuss is about lol

Offline T_J_G

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #7 on: 07 September 2011, 13:04 »
I'll look into that, thanks. What ones should I start with?

Offline shepgti

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #8 on: 07 September 2011, 13:09 »
I'll look into that, thanks. What ones should I start with?

ones i use most are, pola filter, a 3 or 4 stop netural density for longer exposure work, and a ND grad filter (i do also have a few coloured grads)

Offline Ridg

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Re: How to: Graduated filters
« Reply #9 on: 07 September 2011, 13:18 »
:cool:

Think i need to get lightroom! seems to be a bit more focused on the pp side than PS , guess both have thier uses :)

lightroom is just a wrapper for ACR and very limited IMO

I assume to achieve this effect in PS, it is a case of dragging a graduation / gradient onto a new layer on top of your image and positioning accordingly / changing colours etc?

Or is there a better way to do it?

open the image in ACR via Adobe bridge, select the gradient tool and follow shep's instructions  :wink:

IIRC ACR gives you the mid / transition point of the gradient where LR doesn't

I'll look into that, thanks. What ones should I start with?

ones i use most are, pola filter, a 3 or 4 stop netural density for longer exposure work, and a ND grad filter (i do also have a few coloured grads)

I'd say 8 stop ND as 4 still lets a lot of light in, or get 2 * 4 and stack them