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General => General discussion => Photography => Topic started by: Horney on 22 April 2009, 18:55

Title: How To: Understand (and then break) The Rule Of Thirds.
Post by: Horney on 22 April 2009, 18:55
Of the two shots below which do you think is the best?

(http://photoinf.com/General/KODAK/photoProgramCompBig31.jpg)

(http://photoinf.com/General/KODAK/photoProgramCompBig33.jpg)

For some reason most people will say the 2nd one despite it containing the same elements as the 1st but just positioned differently. Why is this? I don't know I'm not a psychologist, that's just the way it is. How you do it is easier to explain and all you need is any old camera.

When you look through your viewfinder/at the screen on camera imagine that it is divided into thirds both horizontally and vertically. Where 2 of those dividing lines meet is the best area to place your subject.

(http://photoinf.com/General/KODAK/photoProgramCompBig23.jpg)

(http://photoinf.com/General/KODAK/photoProgramCompBig24.jpg)
In this shot the photographer picked the upper-right position for the subject so that we could see the full shadow and most of the tracks that lead to the seagull.

Also always consider your sky and ground. Which looks more interesting? If the sky is best place the horizon on the lower divide. Is the sky dull and grey but the ground nice and textured? Put the horizon on the upper divide. You'll be amazed how much this improves those shots of landscapes.

Like any rule it's there to be broken but try taking a few shots with these things in mind and you'll be surprised how suddenly a nice shot becomes a great shot.

*pictures swiped from photoinf.com but I'll take some myself soon to illustrate this instead.

Nick
Title: Re: How To: Understand (and then break) The Rule Of Thirds.
Post by: T_J_G on 27 April 2009, 12:26
Some camera's, mine included, you can put the grid lines onto the viewfinder to help you out!
Title: Re: How To: Understand (and then break) The Rule Of Thirds.
Post by: Mortimer Hill on 31 May 2009, 20:27
In your boat picture, the second has more space for the boat to move into. When you're shooting a moving subject, place it so that it has space to move into
Title: Re: How To: Understand (and then break) The Rule Of Thirds.
Post by: buzzkip on 25 July 2009, 11:45
I'm going to try this. I was pleasantly surprised that I chose the second picture as being my favorite  :rolleyes:
Title: Re: How To: Understand (and then break) The Rule Of Thirds.
Post by: kdiz on 12 August 2009, 18:34
majority of the time it's nicer to include more sky than more ground, i find that when you have more sky in the shot it generally looks brighter and cleaner, you can then focus truly on the item within the shot
Title: Re: How To: Understand (and then break) The Rule Of Thirds.
Post by: Matty-MK3 on 26 October 2009, 19:11
I'm weird, I thought the first pic was best. :undecided: :grin:
Title: Re: How To: Understand (and then break) The Rule Of Thirds.
Post by: tom-gardiner on 06 April 2010, 00:37
oh thats where i bin going wrong, i try and get it if its a car so front a back wheels are on the lines level lol
Title: Re: How To: Understand (and then break) The Rule Of Thirds.
Post by: bobotheclown on 07 May 2010, 21:06
majority of the time it's nicer to include more sky than more ground, i find that when you have more sky in the shot it generally looks brighter and cleaner, you can then focus truly on the item within the shot

It depends what's more interesting. Decide what is visually more interesting land or sky and then compose the image with more of the interesting stuff.

The sky is pretty cloudless but the ground is more interesting:

(http://galerainwater.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/landscape-photography-mount-wilson-copyright-gale-rainwater.jpg)

Whereas this shot the sky is more interesting:

(http://www.landscapedvd.com/desktops/images/landscape1280x1024.jpg)